St Andrew’s Hospice care for adults and children who have been diagnosed with a life-limiting condition as well as providing support for their families and carers. They offer a range of services including inpatient care (with 12 beds in adult services and 4 beds in children’s services), day care for children, lymphoedema clinics and bereavement support. Their wellbeing programme for adults includes coffee and chat to help those who may be isolated, capturing memories, relaxation and arts and crafts groups. They also offer respite stays to support carers, symptom management, complementary therapies and therapeutic activities.

For Learning at Work Week, St Andrew’s Hospice raised awareness of learning and gave all staff opportunities to learn and share their skills, knowledge and passion for their roles. The learning and development team also used the week strategically, to identify colleagues’ learning needs to meet the short-, medium- and long-term requirements of the organisation. 

To create a broad programme, the team worked with every department to make use of all their in-house skills and knowledge. In addition, external partners delivered clinically focused workshops to refresh and develop colleagues’ specialist skills and introduce new ideas and practices. 

 

The hospice delivered 29 sessions virtually over the course of 7 days. Some sessions were for clinical staff, some for non-clinical staff, and some for all staff. The sessions were kept short so that colleagues could dip in and learn new things and discover and explore new subjects easily. Some colleagues shared their learning journeys to show how learning and developed has affected their lives positively.  

             


The topics for the sessions were varied to cover all staff groups including Beginners Guide to Journaling, Walk through MCA Assessments, posture for both patients and for office based staff and How to get the most out of Zoom.  It was also recognized that at this time, it is more important than ever to help staff  from 
a wellbeing perspective so provided self-care and anxiety  management workshops as well as relaxation, a beginner’s guide to journaling and spiritual care.

A programme of activities was shared in posts via Groups in Workplace alongside inspirational quotes and facts about learning. This was complimented by emails, posters and printed cards to reach colleagues both on and off-site site. 

Colleagues have broadened their understanding by coming together, learning from each other and discovering different perspectives. It has improved cross-communications by linking staff across the organisation. The external workshops helped colleagues develop and strengthen procedures and they have requested more sessions like these.

The week has put more focus on interest-led learning and skills sharing across the hospice supporting lifelong learning and wellbeing. The week has supported the hospices' strategic vision to develop and improve services for patients, their families and the wider community by enhancing colleagues’ skills across the organisation. The hospice will use feedback from the week to put on IT sessions to further develop colleague’s digital skills and engage even more colleagues in next year’s event.