The Campaign for Learning’s report, Reforming Adult Social Care: Integrating Funding, Pay, Employment and Skills Policies in England, is based on seventeen contributions from experts in both the adult social care sector and the post-16 education, skills and employability sectors. 

Three themes are common to most of the authors' contributions – the scale of the adult social care sector in England, the complexity of policy making for the sector, and the need for greater integration of funding, pay, employment and skills. 

The pamphlet covers: 

  • the funding of adult social care in England 
  • the employment model for adult social care 
  • the cost-of-living crisis faced by care workers 
  • strategic and structural reforms to the adult social care sector 
  • recruitment into the adult social care sector in the context of the present skills-basedimmigration policy 
  • the role of active labour market policies to fill adult social care vacancies 
    the views of 18-24 year-olds about a career in adult social care
  • the delivery and design of post-16 health and social care qualifications 
  • the debate on Level 3 BTECs and T Levels for 16-18 year-olds with respect to social care 
  • the contribution of apprenticeships and the Adult Skills Fund to upskilling and reskilling the adult social care workforce 
  • the implications of future devolution of the Adult Skills Fund to County Councils which are responsible for the delivery of adult social care
  • the benefits of adult learning to adults in social care, adults working in social care and adults wishing to enter adult social care. 


Contributors 

  • Camille Oung, The Nuffield Trust: The Funding and Delivery of Adult Social Care in England
  • Duncan Brown, Emsi: The Employment Model of Adult Social Care 
  • Louise Murphy, Policy in Practice: Wages, Universal Credit and Adult Social Care Workers
  • Paul Nowak, TUC: A National Care Forum to Fix Social Care
  • Stephen Evans, Learning and Work Institute: A Long-Term Pay, Employment and Skills Plan for Adult Social Care
  • Becci Newton, Institute for Employment Studies: Improving Pay and Job Quality in Adult Social Care
  • Karolina Gerlich, The Care Workers’ Charity: Encouraging Young People and Adults to become Adult Care Workers
  • Chris Goulden, Youth Futures Foundation: A Career in Adult Social Care: The Views of Young People
  • Andrew Morton, ERSA: Targeting Active Labour Market Policies to Fill Adult Social Care Vacancies
  • John Widdowson, Former FE College Principal: Embedding Emotional Support for Learners on Health and Social Care Courses
  • Naomi Dixon, Education and Training Foundation: Supporting Post-16 FE Practitioners to Teach Social Care
  • Elena Wilson, The Edge Foundation: Valuing Level 3 BTECs for 16-18 Year Olds Studying Health and Social Care
  • Julian Gravatt, AoC: What Post-16 FE Can and Cannot do to tackle the Adult Social Care crisis
  • Jane Hickie, AELP: Reforming Apprenticeship Funding and Delivery for Adult Social Care
  • Gemma Gathercole, CWLEP: Adults Skills, Adult Social Care and Devo-Deals
  • Susan Pember, HOLEX: The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning for Adult Social Care
  • Simon Parkinson, WEA: Adult Learning for Adults in Social Care
  • Campaign for Learning: Proposals for reform in England 

 

Download the full paper